Home Scandal and Gossip Madison County special education teacher busted sexting 2 students – has sex...

Madison County special education teacher busted sexting 2 students – has sex with one of them, indicted

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Lyndsey Sherrod Bates
Pictured, Lyndsey Sherrod Bates Alabama special educations teacher.
Lyndsey Sherrod Bates
Pictured, Lyndsey Sherrod Bates Alabama special education teacher.

Lyndsey Bates Alabama special educations teacher indicted after sexting two students and having sex with one of them. Faces 20 years jail.

An Alabama special education teacher accused of exchanging ‘racy text messages’ with two students and having had sex with one of them has been formally charged. 

Lyndsey Sherrod Bates — a former teacher and volleyball coach at Madison County High School in Gurley — was indicted Friday for allegedly having sex with a 17-year-old boy and sending explicit texts and photos to a second student who was at least 16 years old, court records cited by AL.com show.

Neither student was in Bates’ special education classes at the school, where she resigned one month prior to her arrest in April. 

The media outlet reported Bates, 23, being indicted on five criminal charges involving inappropriate sexual conduct with students, felony charge of engaging in a sex act with a student younger than 19. The educator was also charged with distributing obscene material to a student and having sexual contact with a student.

Lindsay Bates is the former daughter-in-law of a chief deputy for the Madison County Sheriff’s Office, which issued a statement at the time of her arrest assuring that the relationship played no role in their investigation.

Chief Deputy Stacy Bates, the father of Lyndsey’s ex-husband, Andrew, was ‘never involved’ in the case, Madison County Sheriff Kevin Turner said. The former couple had been together since 2015, before Bates eventually married her ‘high school’ sweetheart.

Of note, the educator’s estrangement from her husband came two days after Bates’ arrest, with Andrew Bates citing ‘incompatibility’ in divorce filings. The uncontested breakup was later finalized in July, some 14 months after the couple got married in May, 2018. 

Lyndsey Sherrod Bates
Lyndsey Bates as shown in recent wedding pictures. Image via social media.
Lyndsey Bates Alabama special education teacher
Pictured the Alabama special education teacher and her former husband, Andrew Bates, who recently filed for divorce against the educator.

Lyndsey Bates passed background check at time of hiring early 2018:

Despite charges against the educator, Lyndsey Bates, continues to maintain her teaching certificate, according to state education officials.

‘This status will be updated as soon as possible,’ records cited by AL.com show.

Bates cleared a background check when she was hired at the beginning of the 2018 school year. She said in her resignation letter that she planned to seek a position in a ‘different area of education,’ records show.

Counselors were made available to students after Bates’ arrest, according to a statement released by the district’s superintendent, WAFF reports.

Come Thursday, Bates’ Facebook page was deactivated.

Although 16 is the age of consent in Alabama, the state’s teacher-student sex law says, ‘consent is not a defense.’

If convicted of engaging in a sex act with a student younger than 19, the female educator faces up to 20 years in prison and must register as a sex offender for the rest of her life.

‘She’s looking forward to clearing this up and having her day in court,’ her defense attorney, Robert Tuten, told AL.com.

Bates will remain free on bail pending trial, which is scheduled for February 2020.

Not immediately clear is what led to the female educator abusing her position of trust, authority and position of power to subjugate her male victims.

Alabama special education teacher
Lyndsey Bates Alabama special education teacher.
Alabama special education teacher
Pictured the Alabama special education teacher and her former husband. Drew Bates.
Lyndsey Sherrod Bates
Lyndsey Bates Alabama special education teacher: ‘Why decline?’ Image via social media.
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