Weight watchers decides to confuse America.


Weight watchers decides to confuse America. Fat Americans are now panicking.

How many points is an apple worth or for that matter a double Big Mac worth on Weight Watcher’s grid? No matter what you thought or currently think, Weight Watchers has decided to go ahead and change the rules and ostensibly given you more reasons to get fatter this Holiday season.

Gawker: A Weight Watchers overhaul has upended the lives of its 750,000 members, for whom the point system has ontological implications: A Burger King bacon double cheeseburger exists to them not as a food item made up of protein, carbs, etc., but as 12 points. Under the new scheme, the bacon double cheeseburger still is 12 points. But where Weight Watchers used to get 22 points a day, they now have 31 points a day. It’s like Weight Watchers reached down their gullet and expanded every members’ stomach!

Does this mean in order to lose weight I’m once again relegated to eating sensibly and exercising? Wouldn’t that be a burden on my impulsive sensitivities? Surely Weight Watchers must have a reason for putting me and you (but mostly you readers) into another moral quandary- Big Mac or sliver of apple? No more sour cream scoop or how about another glass of red wine? What if the red wine is a beajolias and less than 2 years old? How about that extra peperoni slice sitting on the counter from last night?

NY Times: The new plan, company officials say, is based on scientific findings about how the body processes different foods. The biggest change: All fruits and most vegetables are point-free (or free of PointsPlus, as the new program is called). Processed foods, meanwhile, generally have higher point values, which roughly translates to: should be eaten less.

Sounds sensible. But is it easy to follow?

Under the old system, for example, the average new member of Weight Watchers was allotted 22 daily points and an extra 35 weekly points. Now, the average new member is allotted 31 daily points and 49 weekly points. So while two potato latkes are now seven points instead of five, their portion of the total is about the same (too high). But a Burger King bacon double cheeseburger is still 12 points, making it slightly less objectionable under the new regime. And that little pack of Oreos? Up a point, to three.

Ultimately isn’t the real appeal of Weight Watchers the fact that it acts like a surrogate authority which gives us permission to gorge on foods that we instictively know are bad for us (but too delicious to give up) and now with the new change we are once again forced to reckon with the fact that fast food, processed food are still just as bad for us albeit with the new conundrum that that Weight Watchers is no longer sanctioning them, even as tid bit guilt portions. So much for dieting and the wonderful illusions we are prone -begging to believe.

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  • Emme

    Weight watchers is insulting: Grown adults counting points to eat. This is a shame. Common sense will tell you to avoid Weight Watchers. I am 77 and the SPIRIT HAPPY DIET is the only one that works because YOU eat what you want and it works.

  • Deana

    Weight watchers is not insulting and trust me I have plenty of common sense and intelligence. I happen to be coming up on my one year a nniversary with weight watchers and love the new PointsPlus program. With weight watchers you are allowed to still eat what you want, as long as you remain within your limits. It’s not a “restricting diet” but moreso a way for people to become more cognizant of what they put in their body and portion control. WW emphasizes portions, fruits/vegetables and power foods that are more directed towards satiety so that you are left feeling fuller longer and will eat less bad food.

    WW is a lifestyle change and has worked for most of those who have tried it. I know it is the only thing that works for me because I can still enjoy food…especially the food I like. I’m just more cognizant of the bad food that exists out there.

    Don’t judge or put down people for trying to make a positive change in their lives with regards to their health. If it works for them then great! Everyone can’t live a spirit happy diet and be healthy/successful…common sense will tell you that.